VACANCY: Professor of Applied Mathematics, Ireland

TITLE OF POST: Professor of Applied Mathematics.

LOCATION: University of Limerick

SALARY SCALE: €114,740 – €140,961 p.a.

JOB DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Doctoral degree (level 10NFQ) in a relevant discipline

OVERALL PURPOSE OF THE JOB:

Teaching, research and academic leadership in Applied Mathematics.

DESCRIPTION:

We are seeking to appoint a Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. This department is responsible for teaching at all levels across the University and also has a thriving research programme. In November 2015 the department was granted an Athena SWAN Bronze award, reflecting its commitment to addressing gender equality.

Applications are invited from leading researchers in any of the following subfields of Applied Mathematics: mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, mathematical geophysics, complex networks, numerical analysis, mathematical biology, game theory, probability theory and systems theory.

A commitment to collaborative research with departments and research centres across the University of Limerick is desirable. The Mathematics Applications Consortium for Science and Industry (MACSI) is a research centre based in the department which applies mathematics to diverse real-world problems. Recent examples of MACSI projects include the modelling of moisture absorption on a silicon chip, information diffusion on Twitter-like networks, and valve wear in an alumina refinery. MACSI also works closely with research centres within UL, such as the new smart manufacturing SFI funded centre Confirm, the Dairy Processing Technology Centre (DPTC), the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology Centre (PMTC) and the Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC). Other collaborative opportunities within the University include the Bernal Institute, Lero and health-related departments.  Further application areas of interest to the University are outlined in its strategic plan, Broadening Horizons 2015-19.

Research areas of particular strength in the department include mathematical modelling, fluid mechanics, complex systems, differential equations, numerical analysis, inverse problems, optimisation, stochastic dynamics, financial mathematics and statistics.

The successful candidate will have a doctoral degree (level 10NFQ) in a relevant discipline, an international research reputation and a significant publication record. A record of achieving research funding and leading a research group is desirable, as is experience of working in collaborative and interdisciplinary projects. The successful candidate should also demonstrate interest and experience in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

 Essential Criteria:

  • Doctoral degree (level 10NFQ) in a relevant discipline
  • Post doctoral experience in research, industry or academia
  • A significant track record in research and publication in a relevant area of Applied Mathematics
  • Submission of a statement of research plans (maximum 2 pages) and a statement of teaching experience and interests (maximum 2 pages)

Desirable Criteria:

  • A commitment to collaborative research with departments and research centres across the University, in particular MACSI
  • Experience in teaching at undergraduate or postgraduate levels
  • A record of obtaining competitive research funding
  • Evidence of academic leadership in Applied Mathematics
  • A track record of academic/industrial collaboration and/or realising industry funding

 Informal enquiries regarding the post may be directed to:
Dr Sarah Mitchell
Head
Department of Mathematics & Statistics
University of Limerick
Email: sarah.mitchell@ul.ie

Apply via the HR website http://www.ul.ie/hrvacancies/

The 27th Biennial Conference on Numerical Analysis

The 27th Biennial Conference in Numerical Analysis took place at the University of Strathclyde, 27-30 June.

The series began at St. Andrews University in 1965, then spent many happy years at the University of Dundee, and finally moved to Glasgow in 2009. A full history, up to 2005, can be found on Alistair Watson’s website, and comments on the 50th Anniversary Meeting can be found on Nick Higham’s blog.

Numerical Analysis pens
Pens from the 20th, 21st, and 22nd biennial conferences on Numerical Analysis.

The conference has a traditional feel in that, whereas many meetings of its scale are held at hotels and conference centres, this one is entirely organised by academics, and hosted on a university campus. This traditional feel contrasts with a modern focus: through its twelve plenary talks, fifteen mini-symposia, and numerous contributed talks, the Biennial Conference reflects the many recent innovations in numerical analysis.

The plenary talks are at the core of this meeting, which opened with Christian Lubich (Tubingen) presenting recent developments in dynamic low-rank approximation, and Valeria Simoncini’s talk on methods for large-scale Sylvester equations (and related problems). David Keyes kept the focus on (extremely) large-scale problems, exhorting the numerical analysis community to develop algorithms that keep pace with modern hardware. The (now) classical roots of numerical analysis, and their influence on current trends were the focus of, for example, the Fletcher-Powell lecture, given by Philip Gill (San Diego). And that was all on Day 1, which concluded with a civic reception hosted by The City of Glasgow in the spectacular City Chambers.

 

DEstep
Donald Estep (Colorado) making the case for computational measure theory

Wednesday’s plenaries were delivered by Donald Estep (Colorado), Ilaria Perugia (Vienna), and Gerlind Plonka-Hoch on, respectively, “computational measure theory” (with applications to modelling extreme weather events), completely discontinuous finite elements, and sublinear sparse FFT methods.

AnnaKarinTornberg
Anna-Karin Tornberg (KTH) on Quadrature by expansion (source: Heather Yorston)

Anna-Karin Tornberg (KTH; above) opened Thursday’s sessions. She was followed by Endre Suli (Oxford) who married the classical and modern, where he outlined the analysis of finite element approximations for viscous incompressible fluids, accompanied by a live demonstration with tooth-paste.

Through out the meeting, it is clear that the distinctions between numerical analysis and computer science are becoming increasingly blurred, particularly in the field of networks, where algorithms for graphs and matrices are of core importance. This featured in the A.R. Mitchell lecture, delivered by Andrew Stuart (Caltech). He discussed machine learning and for classification algorithms applied on large graphs.

That evening the conference dinner was hosted in the remarkable Trades Hall, which was designed and built between 1791 and 1794. The after dinner speech, which was both humorous and thoughtful,  was given by Ivan Graham (Bath).

TopTable
View from the top table (source: David Gleich)

Arguably, the best was saved until last. In Friday morning’s first plenary lecture, Francoise Tisseur (Manchester) made a compelling case for the use of tropical algebra in
numerical analysis, with the applications to incomplete factorisations being particularly compelling. She was followed by David Gleich (Purdue), who explained the motivation and methods for locating motifs (such as triangles) in networks.

Of course, there was much more to the conference than the plenary talks and receptions. There were 15 minisymposia on topics ranging from “M1” on non-local problems (such as the en vogue fractional differential equations) to “M15” on Chebfun, as well as contributed talks. In particular, there were numerous presentations by student participants. Three of these were awarded prizes by the UK and Ireland section of SIAM:

  • Denis Devaud, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, “Exponential convergence in
    H^1/2 of hp-approximation for parabolic equations”
  • James Rynn, University of Manchester, UK, “Using Surrogate Models to
    Accelerate Bayesian Inverse Uncertainty Quantification”
  • Florian Wechsung, University of Oxford, UK, “Shape Optimization with
    Geometric Constraints Using Moreau-Yosida Regularization”

The judging panel was Ivan Graham (Bath), Natalia Kopteva  (Limerick) and John Mackenzie (Strathclyde).

To conclude, the 27th conference was at least as successful as the previous 26. For that, the numerical analysis community owes its gratitude to the University of Strathclyde’s Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing Group and, in particular, Philip Knight, John Mackenzie and Alison Ramage.

sdr
The conference dinner took place in one of Glasgow’s historic buildings: the Glasgow Trades Hall.